Wednesday, July 25, 2007

dream

I dreamt I was shown the opening spread (pp. 2-3) of a magazine and asked, 'have you seen this? James Cruickshank's in it'. The magazine was called Pierrot and most of pp. 2-3 was taken up with very elegant and painstaking drawings, they looked like engravings, with the title 'Thoughts of Pierrot'. In the dream I knew all about the youth movement of the Pierrots, they were languid, lazy gay young men who lolled about feeling sorry for themselves. The drawings/cartoons were of Pierrots in outer suburbia being cross at their parents or bemoaning how bored they were. I knew that the Pierrots were simultaneously celebrating their culture, and poking fun at themselves.

I thought the part of the spread I was supposed to be looking at was a very elaborate picture of a 1930s living room with no-one in it, and I said, 'Where is he?' Answer came, no, he writes for the magazine, and I realised there was a staff box in the top left hand corner. His name wasn't in that either. I said something like, 'oh I thought you meant he was hiding in the picture'.

I knew, without reading it in the magazine, that the Pierrots were all in a fluster because Marc Almond was in town, and he was a hero of theirs and had embraced their movement. I also knew that they greatly admired Rowland S. Howard.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

Dave boy. Damn sweet dream. Where can i throw up?
It's alright I don't think I have to any more. I think you are using cut-up-post Burroughs-post Eno-initiative to trigger something interesting from your tired and justified and righteous brain. What about replying to messages sent concerning Sherbet? Forget Roland Howard, his version of 'Summer Love' sucked! White Wedding wasn't bad, but when he did 'Jump In My Car' I lost all respect for him.
Stephen
You know how to contact me don't you? Just push your finger down on the keys and whistle or something like that.
S.

boy moritz said...

Dave boy, YOU NEED CLOSURE

David said...

Later, I discovered Cleis Pearce, formerly of Mackenzie Theory, plays on James Cruickshank's second album.